fbpx

LG’s G7 ThinQ flagship smartphone will be launching next month

If you thought LG forgot about their flagship smartphone this year, you’re wrong. The South Korean company will be launching their flagship G7 globally in less than a month’s time! The only problem is that they’ve added a really dumb suffix to their once clean flagship name: This year’s phone will be called the LG G7 ThinQ.

If you thought that that was pronounced “think” but with a Q, you’re wrong. According to The Verge who spoke to LG’s reps about the name, it will apparently be pronounced like “think-you”. What. Are. You. Doing. LG?

Nevertheless, the smartphone will apparently launch on the 2nd of May 2018 in New York City. So far, details about the handset is still fairly scarce except for the render you see above which AndroidHeadlines obtained from a “reliable source”.

The phones depicted in the render do seem to line up with earlier rumours in which the G7 will apparently come with a notch. At the back, you’ll see that the fingerprint scanner remains, so at least they didn’t go full Apple. LG looks to also retain its dual-camera system, only this time it will be aligned vertically instead of horizontally.

One interesting thing to note is that it looks like the power button will now live at the side alongside the volume rockers. There is also a fourth button which will apparently be for LG’s AI software, ThinQ.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen ThinQ on an LG smartphone as they showed of the V30S ThinQ earlier this year. But on that phone, the AI was only used for camera scene recognition and Bixby-vision-like identify-then-shop functions. It will be interesting to see how much more they will expand this “Empathic AI” to.

SEE ALSO:  Security alert: New version of known surveillance malware now able to extract sensitive data even if its encrypted

Other rumoured specs include a Snapdragon 845 processor, 6GB of RAM, 64GB of storage and a camera with an f/1.5 aperture lens.

The G7 ThinQ looks like a promising device — silly name aside — but the problem for Malaysia has always been availability. Let’s just hope it doesn’t take 7 months to arrive again.

[SOURCE, 2, 3]