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CMCO SOP: Four common misconceptions debunked

Almost a week has passed since it came into effect, yet confusion prevails over the standard operating procedures (SOP) for the conditional movement control order (CMCO) currently in place in Selangor, the Federal Territories and Sabah.

This is further exacerbated by unverified claims widely circulated on social media, which has fuelled the uncertainty over how the SOP is enforced.

With the partial lockdown only expected to be lifted on October 26 at the earliest in Sabah and the following day for Selangor and the Federal Territories, Malay Mail has compiled a list of the most common misconceptions regarding the CMCO SOP so you know what’s true and false.

Claim: Individuals sitting side by side in a car will be fined RM1,000 

Fact: There are no fines for seating arrangements in a vehicle. However, a RM1,000 compound fine will be issued if the stipulated two-person limit in a car is exceeded.

As for groups of more than two people who commute in the same vehicle, the government has advised them to obtain police permission if they wish to continue doing so.

When it comes to commercial vehicles carrying goods and providing essential services, including those involved in business and industrial activities, the number of people in such vehicles is limited to what is allowed by the commercial vehicle licence.

Claim: E-hailing and taxis are not allowed to operate since fines will be issued for individuals sitting side by side

SOP issued by the National Security Council (NSC) has specifically stated that taxis and e-hailing vehicles are limited to ferrying two passengers. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri

Fact: As stated in the aforementioned paragraph, there are no fines for seating arrangements in a vehicle.

However, the SOP issued by the National Security Council (NSC) has specifically stated that taxis and e-hailing vehicles are limited to ferrying two passengers.

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This means a total of three people are allowed in one vehicle only.

Claim: Individuals need police permission to travel within different districts in KL 

Fact: No, you do not need permission from the police to travel within different districts in Kuala Lumpur. 

The government has since clarified that Kuala Lumpur residents are free to travel within the capital city as it is considered a single district.

The public has also been advised that travelling should be limited to work purposes and replenishing essential supplies while inter-state travel exceptions can be given for medical purposes or a relative’s death.

However, if you choose to travel beyond an area currently under the CMCO, a letter of authorisation from your employer is still required for police inspection.

Claim: Jogging and cycling are prohibited during the two-week CMCO period as they fall under the recreational activities category

The government has allowed sports activities including those that are carried out individually or without contact with others or outdoor sports that do not exceed 10 individuals — Picture by Shafwan Zaidon

Fact: Jogging and cycling are allowed during the CMCO period. 

To clarify further, the government has allowed sports activities including those that are carried out individually or without contact with others or outdoor sports that do not exceed 10 individuals, as well as e-sports, while those disallowed are swimming pool activities, contact sports and championships.

The Youth and Sports Ministry, via a statement, has also said that activities such as walking, jogging, cycling and solo aerobics that are carried out in open areas are among the activities allowed in the CMCO areas of Sabah, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya. —  Malay Mail

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