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iPhone X has the best camera for photography

Apple‘s iPhone X is taking the world by storm and I haven’t seen people this excited about something with X in the name since the X-Men. It’s not hard to see why because this is the most exciting iPhone since the first one came out 10 years ago. But at the end of the day, it’s still a smartphone so it still needs to be good at smartphone-y things like a good battery life, good performance, and a good camera.

The good news is, according to the boffins over at DxOMark, Apple’s latest device has the best camera for photography, beating out every other smartphone they’ve ever tested.

Yep, iPhone X scored a whopping 101 points in the website’s stills photography test, pushing it over previous class leaders like Samsung’s Galaxy Note8 and the Huawei Mate 10 Pro, both of which scored 100 points. For the uninitiated, DxOMark’s scoring system isn’t an out of 100 so scores can go past 100 points.

DxOMark attributes this high score to the iPhone X’s excellent performance in HDR and its ability to expose a scene well. The site also cited accurate colour rendering and white balance, as well as good detail preservation plus low noise in most lighting conditions. iPhone X’s improved telephoto lens (now with optical image stabilisation) also received praise for improving portrait photos because of pleasing bokeh and sharp results even in low light.

However, despite this strong performance in photography, the iPhone X’s overall score is lower than that of the Google Pixel 2, netting itself a score of “only” 97. This ties it with the Huawei Mate 10 Pro and slots it just under the Google Pixel 2’s score of 98, making this the second best phone DxOMark has ever tested.

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iPhone X was let down by its performance in DxOMark’s video tests. At first, we were a little surprised because Apple’s iPhone X and 8/8 Plus are the only smartphones capable of shooting 4K video footage at 60fps. Then, we noticed DxOMark’s testing protocol where, when it comes to video, the site only tests the devices at their default settings, which is at Full HD 1080p at 30fps.

In any case, its video score of 89 isn’t bad either. DxOMark praises its good dynamic range and fast convergence during light changes. However, they do note that there is noticeable underexposre and visible luminance noise in low-light.

For more info, you can check out DxOMark’s full review.

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